Chips Challenge 2 Wiki
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The (x+4n) repeater is a repeater with a TRUE output on tick x (where x is usually between 3 and 6, inclusive), and every 4th tick after.

Screen Shot 2015-05-28 at 12.38

One way to construct a (4+4n) repeater. The purple wall becomes a 12TF and is passable only to objects moving in 12-step.

A (3+4n) repeater has a TRUE output on ticks 3, 7, 11 (+4n). Since movement is processed on ticks 3, 6, 9, and 12 (+12n), this repeater is always in sync with objects traveling in 3-step.

A (4+4n) repeater has a TRUE output on ticks 4, 8, 12 (+4n) and is in sync with objects traveling in 12-step.

Screen Shot 2015-05-28 at 12.47

One way to construct a 5+4n repeater. The purple wall becomes a 9TF and is passable only to objects traveling in 9-step

A (5+4n) repeater has a TRUE output on ticks 5, 9, 13 (+4n). in sync with objects traveling in 9-step, but out of sync with all others.

A (6+4n) repeater has a TRUE output on ticks 6, 10, 14 (+4n) and is in sync with objects traveling in 6-step.


The practical function of the four (x+4n) repeaters is to produce the following 8 tiles:

  • Three Toggle Wall (3TW): blocks 3-step movement, allows all others
  • Three Toggle Floor (3TF): allows 3-step movement, blocks all others
  • Six Toggle Wall (6TW): blocks 6-step movement, allows all others
  • Six Toggle Floor (6TF): allows 6-step movement, blocks all others
  • Nine Toggle Wall (9TW): blocks 9-step movement, allows all others
  • Nine Toggle Floor (9TF): allows 9-step movement, blocks all others
  • Twelve Toggle Wall (12TW): blocks 12-step movement, allows all others
  • Twelve Toggle Floor (12TF): allows 12-step movement, blocks all others


To build a ( [x] + 4n) repeater, the following (x+20n) repeaters are wired in parallel:

  • ( [x] + 20n)
  • ( [x+4] + 20n)
  • ( [x+8] + 20n)
  • ( [x+12] + 20n)
  • ( [x+16] + 20n)
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